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  • Visiting the tomb of Meresankh III, Eastern Cemetery, Giza G7530-G7540 – Scribe in the House of Life: Hannah Pethen Ph.D.

    Mastabas in the Eastern Cemetery, with the Great Pyramid of Khufu (rear right); the pyramid of Khafre (rear, left) and the pyramid of Khufu’s Queen Henutsen (rear, centre) behind. A small chapel is visible in the ‘street’ between the mastabas in the foreground, with the denuded edge of mastaba G7430 behind it. To the left is the north edge of…

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  • Archaeology and Heritage Outreach Today: A Forum Summary

    From April 2021 Months ago, Project Archaeology’s Public Education Coordinator Kate Hodge asked me to prepare a blog post for the Modern Issues in Archaeology series. At the time, I wasn’t sure what I would write about, but I was confident I could come up with something.  Closer to the due date, I started musing on my blog’s focus. Kate…

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  • Is Archaeology Essential?

    In 2013, I was an education intern for History Colorado. Little did I know that 5.5 years later I would be the Assistant State Archaeologist starting on the 142nd anniversary of Colorado becoming a state, August 1, 2018 (History Colorado Center; Denver, CO) (Photo credit: Becca Simon) When asked to reflect on my career, I decided to read the cover…

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  • Female Acrobat – Egypt Museum

    This limestone statuette of a female in an arched position dates from the Middle Kingdom and was discovered within Tomb D303, at Abydos. The tomb is associated with a man named Sa-Inher. The woman is archived as an acrobat due to the pose, however, it is also quite likely she was a dancer. Perhaps she was set in stone performing…

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  • Thinking about Today – Investigating A Wintu Roundhouse

    With Investigating a Wintu Roundhouse, there is no exception. Students learn about roundhouses and Wintu architecture as well as the importance of the roundhouse to the Wintu people. Roundhouses were important in the past and they are still important and used for ceremonies today.  All roundhouses were round and built into the ground.  They were constructed with earth and wood.…

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  • Investigating the Clovis Child Burial

    Project Archaeology is immensely proud of our friend, tribal consultant, and fellow curriculum writer and teacher, Dr. Shane Doyle, Apsáalooke, who is an educational and cultural consultant  from Crow Agency, Montana. He was asked to serve as the tribal liaison for the repatriation (reburial) of the Anzick child.  Dr. Doyle is a  colleague of Crystal Alegria (Montana Coordinator) and Jeanne…

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  • Want to Get a Jump on the Common Core? Project Archaeology Is the Answer

    By Jeanne M. Moe, BLM Project Archaeology LeadMarch 15, 2014 Archaeology.  The word alone is fascinating and immediately brings images of far-off lands, fabulous artifacts, and ancient lifeways to our minds.  Fascinating, but you must be an archaeologist to study the ways of the ancients, right?  Wrong.    Archaeology is a perfect addition to upper elementary classrooms and provides a…

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  • The Tragedy and Triumph of America’s First Born

    Ancient Graves in Alaska Tell the Story of Twin Brothers ARTICLE BY: Dr. Shane Doyle. He has served as a researcher for the Centre for Geogenetics and adjunct instructor at Montana State University-Bozeman.  Doyle helped lead the  the reburial of the Anzick Clovis Boy on June 28, 2014. According to reports from the National Science Foundation, the recent archaeological discovery…

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  • Egypt Centre Collection Blog: Senenmut’s Astronomical Ceiling

    Pippa Dell retired from a long academic career in Psychology and now pursues her interests in Egyptology, art, and gardening. She recently went to Egypt with the Kemet Klub on their Sacred Landscapes tour and had the privilege of visiting Senenmut’s tomb (TT353), including its wonderful astronomical ceiling! Like many others, I was first introduced to the wonders of ancient…

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  • Ramesses II and Offering Table

    This limestone statue, which stands at 171cm tall, depicts the 19th Dynasty king, Ramesses II, knelt before a hes-vase shaped offering platform, whilst the king himself holds an offering tray. British Museum. EA96 The bottom has been restored onto a modern platform, but the rest of the statue is in remarkable condition. Ramesses II can be seen wearing a striped…

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