Travel

WordPress is a favorite blogging tool of mine and I share tips and tricks for using WordPress here.

  • Visiting the tomb of Meresankh III, Eastern Cemetery, Giza G7530-G7540 – Scribe in the House of Life: Hannah Pethen Ph.D.

    Mastabas in the Eastern Cemetery, with the Great Pyramid of Khufu (rear right); the pyramid of Khafre (rear, left) and the pyramid of Khufu’s Queen Henutsen (rear, centre) behind. A small chapel is visible in the ‘street’ between the mastabas in the foreground, with the denuded edge of mastaba G7430 behind it. To the left is the north edge of…

    Read More »
  • Female Acrobat – Egypt Museum

    This limestone statuette of a female in an arched position dates from the Middle Kingdom and was discovered within Tomb D303, at Abydos. The tomb is associated with a man named Sa-Inher. The woman is archived as an acrobat due to the pose, however, it is also quite likely she was a dancer. Perhaps she was set in stone performing…

    Read More »
  • Egypt Centre Collection Blog: Senenmut’s Astronomical Ceiling

    Pippa Dell retired from a long academic career in Psychology and now pursues her interests in Egyptology, art, and gardening. She recently went to Egypt with the Kemet Klub on their Sacred Landscapes tour and had the privilege of visiting Senenmut’s tomb (TT353), including its wonderful astronomical ceiling! Like many others, I was first introduced to the wonders of ancient…

    Read More »
  • Ramesses II and Offering Table

    This limestone statue, which stands at 171cm tall, depicts the 19th Dynasty king, Ramesses II, knelt before a hes-vase shaped offering platform, whilst the king himself holds an offering tray. British Museum. EA96 The bottom has been restored onto a modern platform, but the rest of the statue is in remarkable condition. Ramesses II can be seen wearing a striped…

    Read More »
  • Takait – Egypt Museum

    Takait was a priestess of the god Amun Ra, sometime during the 19th Dynasty, c. 1300 B.C. Her beautiful coffin lid is 170cm in length and is made from wood that has been plastered and painted. Liebieghaus, Frankfurt:”Over the body, the kneeling sky goddess Nut spreads out her winged arms. In the inscription that runs vertically down her legs, Takait…

    Read More »
  • Detail from the Coffin of Khui – Tales from the Two Lands

    This is a close up of a section of a rectangular Middle Kingdom (c.4000 years ago) coffin. Out of shot to the right are the large pair of eyes that you typically find on such coffins, and the text that runs along the top and in the vertical columns is a standard funerary formula. The vignette that I’ve photographed is…

    Read More »
  • Nefertiti, Queen and Pharaoh of Egypt: Her Life and Afterlife

    Nefertiti, Queen and Pharaoh of Egypt: Her Life and Afterlife (Lives and Afterlives). Egypt’s sun queen magnificently revealed in a new book by renowned Egyptologist, Aidan Dodson. “During the last half of the fourteenth century BC, Egypt was perhaps at the height of its prosperity. It was against this background that the “Amarna Revolution” occurred. Throughout, its instigator, King Akhenaten,…

    Read More »
  • Wadj-shemsi-su – Egypt Museum

    Inscribed with, “Wadj-shemsi-su, engendered by Betyu-ka (his father), born of […] (his mother)”, as well as in cursive hieroglyphs, a fragment of Spell 17 from the Book of the Dead, this fragmentary lid belonged to a man who lived during Ancient Egypt’s 18th Dynasty named Wadj-shemsi-su. Princeton University Art Museum. 1998-37 From approximately 1500–1425 B.C., the coffin lid is made…

    Read More »
  • Rose granite Amenhotep III – Egypt Museum

    Measuring at just under 20cm tall (19.1cm), this rose, or red granite head depicts the 18th Dynasty king Amenhotep III and dates from approximately 1390 -1352 B.C. Currently on display at the Louvre in Paris, unfortunately, not much else is documented about the piece. Musée du Louvre. E 17187 Musée du Louvre. E 17187 More like this

    Read More »
  • Plaster face of a man, possibly Ay

    This face of a man was discovered within the remnants of the Sculptor Thutmoses’s workshop in Tel el-Amarna. Although unnamed, some scholars propose it may be the face of Ay, who is also thought to be a brother of Queen Tiye and was definately king after the death of king Tutankhamun. This association of Ay with the head is due…

    Read More »
Back to top button